Article Title:Becoming mums part one: hi baby!
Category:True Stories
Author or Credit:Jacqui Stanford
Published on:16th April 2015 - 01:43 pm
Published by:GayNZ.com
Internet Archive link:https://web.archive.org/web/20170423044601/http://www.gaynz.com/articles/publish/36/article_16700.php
NDHA link:http://ndhadeliver.natlib.govt.nz/ArcAggregator/arcView/frameView/IE28141248/http://www.gaynz.com/articles/publish/36/article_16700.php
Note that the National Library of New Zealand (NDHA) website uses both cookies and frames. The first time you click on a link it first may take you to the archived front page of gaynz.com. Close the window and try again. This is because the NDHA website uses cookies and you cannot access an indiviual page without visiting the front page first
Story ID:16700
Text:GayNZ.com writer Jacqui Stanford is embarking on one of the most exciting and challenging journeys of her life so far – becoming a mum! Over the next while she will share some aspects of her pregnancy and being a lesbian mum. But don’t worry, she'll leave out the icky stuff! Seeing our baby at an ultrasound for the first time is one of the most astounding experiences of my life so far. Pregnancy hormones don’t help, but I was a mixture of laughter, tears and wonderment as my wife gripped my hand and we watched our little one wave their perfectly formed arms around like they were having an in-utero dance party. We got a wave, and we melted. It’s been 12 weeks of walking on air and I nearly lifted off that ultrasound bed in complete light-headed joy. My wedding day was one of the happiest days of my life. Who knew things could get even more amazing? My wife Dee and I have both always wanted to have children. Long before I figured out I was a lesbian I always knew I wanted to be a mum. Coming out never changed that. Nor should it (I refer you to the wise words of Nigel Latta). Married for a couple of years now, we talked out the logistics long and hard. At the start of this year I was on the cusp of turning 32 and we decided we’d make a start. While Dee will tell people she’s ‘just that good’ insinuating some kind of Immaculate Conception, we of course organised a donor, read up, and just gave it a go. Miraculously, and perhaps thanks to coming from a line renowned for its fertility, we were successful on the very first attempt. Those initial weeks stretch like winter. You never want to get your hopes up, but we did. We tried the early tests, which don’t really work, but got one hopeful positive. And I just felt different. A very long month in and five positive tests in a row (just to make sure!), it was real. We were luckily able to whip off to a perfectly-timed trip to Waiheke for a few days to try and soak it all in. We both know we are among the lucky ones. We have friends who have been trying for months, at great expense, and our hearts go out to those for whom it hasn’t been so easy. It really does. Doubly lucky, I’ve also managed to avoid morning sickness. The hallmarks of my pregnancy so far have been an unending yearning for apples and being a zombie of tiredness. Both of us have been innately calm. We are changed. I have completely lost any tolerance for bullshit, and silly things which used to matter simply don’t. Dee feels completely and utterly connected to our baby and is even more protective than ever. There have been nights of waking up thinking ‘Oh my god I am really going to be a mum” but any minute worry is overcome by excitement and love, and the knowledge that we will just figure anything out. Twelve weeks in, with an amazing ultrasound and the chance to finally tell more people than our closest friends and family, it finally feels truly real that we are bringing a new life into the world. It’s been surreal till now. But seeing our little one, so tiny, so perfect, from their little legs to their button nose, we are in hopelessly in love.     Jacqui Stanford - 16th April 2015
Disclaimer:This page displays a version of the GayNZ.com article with all formatting and images removed. It was harvested automatically and some text content may not have been fully captured correctly: access this content at your own risk. A copy of the full article is available (off-line) at the Lesbian and Gay Archives of New Zealand. This online version is provided for personal research and review and does not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of PrideNZ.com. If you have queries or concerns about this article please email us
Reproduction note:Just before GayNZ.com closed in May 2017, the website owners wrote this article about reproducing content from the website: "our work has always been available for glbti people to use and all we ask is that you not plagiarise it... if you use it anywhere please attribute it to GayNZ.com and where there is an authors name attached please acknowledge that writer."