GAYNZ.COM ARCHIVED ARTICLE
Title: What the?! Credit: GayNZ.com staff Features Sunday 3rd August 2014 - 11:31am1407022260 Article: 15495 Rights
 
In the first edition of an occasional GayNZ.com round up, we look at some of the nonsense that’s dribbled out of the mouths of some of New Zealand’s premier lgbti 'experts' lately. (FYI: they are not experts!) The human measuring stick of everything that’s 'normal', Colin Craig, was on bFM this week where he was asked whether he stands by his 2012 tweet that it is "not intelligent to pretend that homosexual relationships are normal". Craig spluttered that “probably the only clarification needed is what I mean by normal. For me, that’s what, the normal thing, or the norm is what most people do. I think anyone would accept that the vast majority of New Zealanders do have heterosexual relationships." He then went on about adoption by lgbti parents. “I’m a person that thinks that the law should be that when we’re adopting a child that goes into a new home, that the child has a mum or a dad. And I certainly stand by that opinion, I think it’s the right thing to do. And it is normal for a child to be born into a family with a mum and a dad. And I think that should be what we’re aiming for. "Notwithstanding that there will be some people who choose to have different sorts of relationships, nonetheless it’s my view, and it’s still my view as far as I can see will continue to be my view, that when we’re talking adoption we should be prioritising a mum and a dad for that child.” Craig also repeated his view being gay is a choice, but has 'influences'. “And I think for some people genetics or other things can be part of that influence, so I don’t want to simplify what’s not always a simple issue. But for me, I do, I think people make choices on pretty much anything in life, and they can be directed by the influences or not.” WHAT THE!? May we again point out that on Craig’s own logic it’s abnormal to vote for the Conservative Party, as it’s something most people don’t do. This week also saw the launch of a Colin Craig parody website, whose creators sent us a hilarious spoof email threatening legal action because we were being ‘mean’. There was also social media frenzy over this photopshop gem from @cakeburger: The only thing that's confusing is what the heck this guy's on about The man who speaks for every family in New Zealand (FYI: he actually doesn’t) Bob McCoskrie has been thinking up all kinds of nuggets about transgender people, or - as he so knowledgeably calls them - the “gender confused”. He’s used great work that’s been done to encourage schools to be more trans-friendly to launch into another misinformed transphobic tirade about the "agenda" to bring "gender confusion into schools". “Students could pick the toilet or changing room or sports team or uniform of the gender with which they identify at that time,” he froths in a press release, where he claims male students will pretend to be transgender to sneak into the girls' showers. WHAT THE!? It's just “gender dissatisfaction” he says of transgender people, before finishing with a flourish: “ignoring biology is not a proper solution.” Seems like McCoskrie needs to brush up on his queer and trans 101. Simple, really. Of course, ‘What the!?’ moments happen overseas all the time. The most striking example this week is the boss at a language school in Utah who fired a worker because he thought a blog post written on “homophones” might encourage homosexuality. WHAT THE!? FYI: A homophone is the name given to a word which sounds the same as another but has a different meaning, like ‘see’ and ‘sea’, or 'won' and 'one'. The Washington Post's response is hilarious. GayNZ.com staff - 3rd August 2014    
 
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