New Zealand AIDS Foundation - Queer History in the Making

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[00:00:00] This program is brought to you by pride nz.com. [00:00:05] My name is Anne Holleran, I'm a counselor. It's the famous center in today's. And we're here with a stand today with a couple of counselors and educators just to promote six and two, talk a little bit about what we do at the Athena center. So, you know, we work with, we funded to work with innocent population, and to support people with HIV and their families. And we have a counseling service. And also, we do a lot of testing, HIV testing and STI testing for men and women. So we open to anyone. Yeah. [00:00:45] So on your display table, I can see a whole lot of postcards, and they kind of look a wee bit historic, because this is your 30th anniversary. Yes, [00:00:53] exactly, yes. So on, the foundation's put out a set of Postcards of historical posters. And they quite wonderful images, this gorgeous photograph here. And I don't know the names of these men, but they're both actually aerobics champions. And let you know, it's quite a gorgeous campaign. There's this one here, of which people think is actually San Francisco. Well, the beautiful cars and ribbons and balloons, it's actually it's actually New Zealand. So you know, it kind of just shows the history of HIV and six promotion that the foundation has been involved in. [00:01:32] What's your favorite postcode. Um, [00:01:36] I really like this one. This is a beautiful image of to naughty mean, with a gorgeous cloak and beautiful Mako, which is obviously female. And it's a lovely background as the sea and the hose. And the line is strength comes from knowing being young Marty gay, and we're, it's really beautiful. [00:01:58] Secondly, to clear, we've been the imagery in some of the postcards because it seems to have obviously it's changed over time. But what what do you think they've been going for [00:02:07] these available visibility around sexuality, which has always been a part of gay culture and sort of embracing it as, without judgment, that celebration and acceptance and, you know, kind of being able to be overt about the history of AIDS and the pain and suffering and the lack of knowledge and information and, and the fact that it has the stigma involved as well. So I thought there's a kind of a refreshing sort of honesty around and all of these postcards, celebrating and being real, around six and masculinity and bodies and risk. [00:02:46] So how's the AIDS Foundation celebrated this year [00:02:50] with head against the nature the centers so and Christchurch, Auckland and Wellington, the Wellington the beat was a little smaller than the Auckland one held it officer illustrate but, but there was a lot of hot beer and we had people speaking and she had some food and drinking some water. And that was really nice event. [00:03:12] And so what drew you into HIV AIDS counseling, [00:03:16] otherwise wanted the opportunity to work with a lesbian and gay bisexual client base as a counselor and what came out when I was a teenager and quite a conservative town in New Zealand and couldn't wait to get out. And so having worked in different agencies are really jumped at the chance of working with people close to my heart. And after applying for the job twice, I got it. So now they start with and and there's also a lot of people with a lot of passion, and to work really hard and really dedicated [00:03:54] that I had the benefit of working with [00:03:58] so just on a personal level this year is what's coming up to the 50th anniversary of homosexual law reform in New Zealand. Um, do you have any thoughts about you know, how far we've come if we've come that far, and and what are some things that still need to be worked on. [00:04:15] Um, I think living in a place like Wellington, and it feels like sexuality is on the show. But I think we're supposedly it's supposed to be one of the highest educated cities in New Zealand. And so, a lot of knowledge we take for granted, these let you know, the lack of judgment, the celebration, not just acceptance or toleration of but celebration of, of being being gay being queer. I think that doesn't always filter out into all small areas of New Zealand. I really admire the work that people like inside out and schools out do was was absent and the 80s when I was a 90s when I was in high school, and I think those that's making a major change, because it's that, you know, it's the young people coming now that that need to be experiencing something different and open communication as what's kind of needed. So I do think there's a lot of work still to be done. And we have a luxury of living in a place like Wellington that we get to enjoy. Enjoy kind of somebody that celebrates being gay, I think be nice to see that and looking places and Wellington New Zealand. Oh yeah.

This page features computer generated text of the source audio - it is not a transcript. The Artificial Intelligence Text is provided to help users when searching for keywords or phrases. The text has not been manually checked for accuracy against the original audio and will contain many errors.