Kawika and Bernard - Queer History in the Making

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[00:00:00] This program is brought to you by pride in z.com. [00:00:05] Hi, my name is Rebecca hyper, I'm from Hawaii. And I'm here today to support this movement and hopefully gain more education about New Zealand. Queer dumb. [00:00:18] And it's just really exciting to be here. Thank you. [00:00:21] I'm Bernard Lee. [00:00:26] I'm from Borneo raised in Borneo. But I spent some time in the states and Austin, Texas came back was here, since came down to Wellington to study have been in Wellington since 2010. July is my It's been five years. So love it second home. [00:00:47] So describe for me where we are and what we're a part of. So [00:00:52] we're at the New Zealand National Library in Wellington. [00:00:57] We're an organization Oh, we're in a place that's all eyes Bible again. Just say that, yep. That that's correct. And it's a wonderful place where communities get to share their stories and history. And how how they got together, how they formed, and the history behind each community and group basically sharing their their, how they, how they got together. Yep, love it. [00:01:25] So there's quite a few groups here today, what what have been some of your favorite kind of stalls or speeches that you've heard, [00:01:31] I really enjoyed the youth groups that came out there definitely representing and I think it's really great that a lot of youth are being educated about these kinds of access tools that they have now. Like you said earlier said that she wishes that there was information for her when she was younger. But I think it's great that there's a huge youth representation here today just kind of sharing their identity and where they are and who they're helping. And it's a great message. [00:02:00] I agree with Walter as well. The youth are from transform, Rainbow youth inside out, naming new RR all phone or well organized by the youth themselves. And construction, such a small group that actually does a lot, which is astounding, which is really, really informative. And especially what what they said about this transgender community and having the information out for the public and for the medical side. And we will we want the youth to have access to those informations correctly as well. And the last, another group that actually touched my heart was the Chrissy trust Memorial, which shared an in depth understanding of what the older generations had to deal with in the past. When when a person dies, if the families are not supporting them. It's hard. So I get from that. It took a while it It gave me an understanding of how seniors and the older generation had to go through and is dealing with at the moment, which, which sort of touched my heart. Yeah. [00:03:26] So we're in 2015, and we're coming towards the 30th anniversary of homosexual law reform in New Zealand. Both of you from coming outside of New Zealand coming in to hear what do you think it's like for rainbow people in New Zealand compared to say, other parts of the world? Well, [00:03:45] I'm from Hawaii, and we've had civil union, which isn't necessarily a legal marriage. We've had it for a while since the early 90s, I believe. Um, but my husband and I just got married this year. And I think it's, I think it's great coming from Well, I would say, air quote, America, just because I feel like there's a freedom and Wellington especially to walk around with my husband and be affectionate instead of having to withhold my affections in public. I know there are certain parts of America that don't appreciate or don't acknowledge freedoms for all. And I think in New Zealand, especially with this with the passing of the law in 1986. And I think it's just really fantastic. And I hope that they continue with the movement and open more freedoms and more doors for queer individuals. [00:04:42] 1986 is the year I was born. Exactly, exactly. 1986 was the year I was born next year, I'm going to be 30 exactly like [00:04:53] how long has love has been a museum and so [00:04:57] I'm excited. [00:05:00] Excited and is it is really it's heartwarming to know that I could I could be in New Zealand and be myself and coming out for me wasn't that fruitful or eventful? I guess. And being when I arrived here, like five years ago, that's when I came out with to my mom. And it was it was she still has ideas of me being in Phase I guess. So. Being away and being myself here kind of makes it worthwhile. And knowing that I'm celebrating my birthday is along with flawless form. makes it so much better.

This page features computer generated text of the source audio - it is not a transcript. The Artificial Intelligence Text is provided to help users when searching for keywords or phrases. The text has not been manually checked for accuracy against the original audio and will contain many errors.