Rawa Karetai previews the Marriage Equality Conference

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[00:00:00] This podcast is brought to you by marriage equality campaign, Wellington and province ID. com. [00:00:07] My name is Robert territory, and I'm the conference chair for the marriage equality conference. We're about to launch into conference tonight, which we have a look and look into the history from 1986 till the present age of homophobia, law reform, human rights, civil union, and currently we're talking about marriage equality. The conference is supposed to be as inclusive as possible. We've made it free for everybody to turn out, we've tried to help everybody who came to turn up who wants to turn up. And we hope to have such a an amazing conference full of discussion and looking forward into the future of other campaigns such as adoption, anti homophobia campaigns and making sure we get marriage equality for everybody. [00:00:53] What kind of sessions that we've got coming up. [00:00:55] We've got human rights discussion happening on Saturday, we've got how to lobby in peace, how to make sure that groups and people come together and make sure that organized, able to do stuff and lobby in Hays, make sure that they eliminate organizational risk, and how to deal with people like conflict and fighting and all, which naturally occurs when you're putting a few but a few people in a room. But yeah, hopefully we'll have will be encouraging and inspiring people to go back home to wherever they come from. got people in here from Germany, Sydney, [00:01:38] even the UK. So that's pretty exciting. And we're hoping that they'll be able to go home and help the campaigns out as well. But we've got people from Christchurch, Auckland, Hamilton and an island. So hopefully that'll be exciting for them as well. [00:01:50] What has it been like tokenize [00:01:53] it's been great financially, the amount of people that want to help, especially a minority group, like queer people, [00:02:01] the people who just want to get on board and just do stuff for marriage equality, and make sure that we're all acceptance, you know, the discourse out there in the community is, we have no issue with this. Why? Why heaven have a problem at all. And this is almost a non issue. Let's just get it through Parliament and make sure that we are an accepting society and New Zealand [00:02:22] submissions to the swift committee, you have closed another hearing oral submissions, how has the campaign gone so far? [00:02:30] Pretty good. It's a very positive campaign, we don't want it to be a negative campaign, we want it to be a celebration of sorts, this is a chance for us to have our say, and it's a chance for us to finally get married. The civil union bill was a concession of some sorts for a lot of people. And what they really wanted was to get married. And this is an extra step to that. So the young people, especially are very excited about the potential of getting married in the future. And I'm pretty certain that will get it. [00:03:01] If it doesn't happen will probably wait for another 10 years, and I'm going to be 40 by that stage. But you know, marriages on the cats, and I'm looking forward to the day that I say I do, and it's been so worth it. [00:03:13] What do you want people to come away from this conference with [00:03:16] basically, accidents of old people and inspired to do stuff that I you know, some people just don't know what to do. So if they can be inspired to go back to the communities and help out? That will be it, you know, even if it's just one person, that will be enough for me, but I hope to inspire, you know, at least 200 people, if not more, to go out there and be advocates for queer rights. [00:03:39] This was the first time that you've kind of done a political campaign. [00:03:43] Not at all. No, it's the first time I've done queer [00:03:47] thing, a queer advocate. But it's not the first time I've done something like this. It was involved in student politics. I'm quite heavily student president for two years. And I've done amazing things through and now it's my time to do it into the queer movement. [00:04:02] Is there a difference between doing something and say, General politics? And then queer politics? [00:04:08] No, no, not at all. I mean, it's interesting that you still have to be a little bit cautious of the words that you choose. But an all we're all wanting the same thing. It's just how do you get there, and you get that in the in the discourse, when it comes to campaigning, you all have a common target of view. It's just whether or not you agree on how to get there. Yeah, and that's the same wherever you go. It's the fun of the challenge.

This page features computer generated text of the source audio - it is not a transcript. The Artificial Intelligence Text is provided to help users when searching for keywords or phrases. The text has not been manually checked for accuracy against the original audio and will contain many errors.