Qtopia Christchurch - KAHA Youth Hui 2009

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[00:00:00] This program is brought to you by pride in zero.com. [00:00:06] So here we have someone from Q topia, which is a group in Christchurch have a young with us, can you tell us a bit about key topia, [00:00:12] utopia is a youth group that sort of set up independently from schools. We have a range of ages from 14 to 25. It's facilitated by a group of sort of seven core facilitators. We are overlooked by a board. And we also have supervision once a month. It was basically here the idea behind utopia was basically set up at a time when it was a really crappy place for queer youth to be in schools. So [00:00:48] how long has it been around? [00:00:52] It's been around since like, the early 90s. And one form or another, its head, you know, sort of several names. And with any youth group or group, it's gone through peaks and troughs. But at the moment, we've got about 50 people registered as members, and maybe between 10 and 20 of those tune up to an event on a weekly basis. [00:01:16] So you guys are based in Christchurch, there's a there's a stereotype about the South Island and about Christchurch being really redneck and homophobic. How have you found? Is it true? How have you found it? [00:01:30] I think for the most part, Christchurch is the conservative of all the night, the most conservative of all the main centers. And saying that, you know, there are parts of it that are totally homophobic, and then there are parts, you know, that you just don't feel that safe. And but yeah, there's still a lot of work to do. And I mean, Christchurch, in general, just isn't as diverse as Wellington or Auckland. So there's always going to be those sorts of issues, until we get the population up and get some more interesting people in there. Yeah. [00:02:06] And did you grow up in church? Yes. And how did you find coming out? And [00:02:14] yes, speaking for me personally, school was [00:02:17] quite, I didn't feel safe coming out in school. [00:02:19] So I waited until I was in my first year at Christ Church politic. And, yeah, that was just a personal choice. And because, yeah, growing up in Christ Church and knowing what the lay of the land was, yeah, it is quite a scary place. [00:02:40] And so you work with a whole range of young people now who are you know, queer or whatever. As it has it changed? How are they finding life now and school and with their families? I think what's [00:02:54] really happening is that people who are coming along to utopia are younger and you younger and younger, and their apps with the fit, maybe not at school, but at least with their families younger and younger and younger. So there's definitely, you know, headway being made and kind of changing people's attitudes to homophobia and those sorts of things happening slowly but [00:03:21] great, and how did you see [00:03:26] lots of snoring and talking, [00:03:28] I actually took a little blue pill and [00:03:32] I was like a life. [00:03:35] Thank you very much for talking to us and enjoy the rest of [00:03:40] this audio was brought to you by out there. For more information, visit www dot out there.org.nz

This page features computer generated text of the source audio - it is not a transcript. The Artificial Intelligence Text is provided to help users when searching for keywords or phrases. The text has not been manually checked for accuracy against the original audio and will contain many errors.