NAGS Nelson - KAHA Youth Hui 2009

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So here we have someone from eggs. Tell us about negs, and we're negs is and what next is? Next is Nyland, the likes of gays and stripes, which is Alliance group in Maryland College and Nelson. And, yeah. And how long have you been a part of that group? Two and a bit years? Yeah. Since I started school, really? Yeah. And how's how's it been as a school fine with another school people family? Yeah, there's heaps of support from the staff and the school, like, this past year with my new band x out almost full with signatures, and we went around the school and got like, heaps of signatures, especially from like the juniors and stuff. It was really cool. And how are you family with it? Great. Um, my younger sister, she's here 909 last year, and she's part of it, too. And my mom is on the stuff. And she's really supportive. Oh, well, yeah. And so this is your this is your first kind of big, queer, who we meet. I went, No, I went to the SS secure in 2007. So that was really cool. And you've just come out of a session? What was what was your session? About positive and negative messages about gay people? And what was some of those messages? Did you find that you had to deal with any positive and negative messages for you? Um, I think there's always going to be negative, like messages and things that go around school and stuff like that. I don't really care about it. Just kind of laugh at them and come up with a cool comeback. Yeah. Well, so your school and your family have been really supportive. And have you? Have you ever experienced anything Liza? Wow. Yeah. And how well did you sleep last night? I'm not too well. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, you thank you very much for what he does. So you've just come out of a session key tell us a bit about that session. It was about sexuality and gender and the labels that we call ourselves and the labels that other people cause? And so what are the some of the so for someone who wouldn't know? Someone who's straight and who isn't trends? What would you tell them? What would they want to elaborate on? Just kind of, like, Whoa, what what is that? or? Yeah, yeah, I think a lot of the time, we tend to stick with the labels that most people at least heard of, like, the more diverse ones don't really seem to go that far. So we'll stick with training, promo, gay, queer, hetero, trans partner, that sort of thing. And usually don't ask us questions from there, we can elaborate a bit more, but it didn't really the big labels and seem to be the ones that people understand a lot more. And this kind of a whole of a mixed messages or a whole lot of information, but then a whole, not a whole lot of information about trans people out there, how does that kind of impact on some of the identities of your young people and on you, and I think, even within itself, the trans community is extremely diverse. But most people who have just seen things like Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, have this really strong idea of it's what it is. And a lot of the time, they don't even realize that there are twins out there. And you know, they just think we're all lesbians. And it's really hard on a young people like I know, a young guy who wants to transition. And he's just, he's like, I can't everyone always think I'm a drag queen. And that's really hard and trying to challenge that, especially with young people who just haven't had the exposure to the information. And it's just really hard for us trying to support him. So it's okay, you can do what you need to do. But have that be okay with his peers as well? What are some of the problems or some of the limits, I guess, around around gender stereotypes around what it means to be a man and what it means to be a woman. Um, it's just so binary, you know, if you're a male and you straight your masculine, you do certain things, you act a certain way. And if you're female, your feminine and it doesn't really leave room for things like being effeminate, being even really being queer within gender, like, I know, a trans guy who is a gay man. And people don't think about it. I think if you want to be a man, this is what you want to be like, if you want to be a woman, this is what you want to be like. And even just for then, queer stuff, even queer couples, you know which one's the man which one's the one woman, this is how you going to exit who's going to take it and who's going to give it and it's just ridiculous. But it's been that way for so long. Now, people don't even really think about it. And it's actually quite tiring, constantly challenging it, but it's something that needs to be done. And we're seeing the results. It's just a really slow process. So it was something quite cool that that came out of even for me, meeting so many diverse trans people. I don't really hold any other stereotypes, but just actually meeting such a wide range of people was really, really cool for me. You know, that transmission trans woman, different sort of partners, different gender partners, it was just totally awesome, just knowing that they're out there and they're proud of who they are. Thank you very much. This audio was brought to you by out there. For more information, visit www dot out there.org.nz

This page features computer generated text of the source audio - it is not a transcript. The Artificial Intelligence Text is provided to help users when searching for keywords or phrases. The text has not been manually checked for accuracy against the original audio and will contain many errors.